Skip to: search, navigation, or content.


Indiana University Bloomington

Business Law

Learn More

OnTopic

This issue of OnTopic focuses on faculty research in the important areas of law and ethics in the business world.

Batting a Thousand

Scott Freedman BS'06

Labor Relations Intern, Major League Baseball

Scott Freedman

“My Kelley Business Law education has provided me with a broad foundation of legal knowledge and skills to apply to any industry, sports included.”

Read about other alumni >>

Scott Freedman’s career trajectory is like a home run knocked out of the park—you’ve just got to sit back and watch it soar.

A lifelong lover of baseball, Freedman has dedicated his career to our national pastime. Now a labor relations intern with Major League Baseball (MLB) in New York City, Freedman has certainly worked his way up the ranks in his quest for a full-time gig at MLB. A quick scan of his resume shows his passion for the sport: assistant box office manager of the minor league Frederick Keys ball club in Maryland; operations intern of BaseballSoftballUK in London, England; and baseball operations intern of the Cincinnati Reds and the New York Mets.

He credits his Kelley Legal Studies major with helping him nab a job in the field of his dreams.

"My Kelley Business Law education has provided me with a broad foundation of legal knowledge and skills to apply to any industry, sports included,” he says. “My thesis research for L470 Research in Business Law and Public Policy provided me with a relevant and tangible product to offer to officials throughout Major League Baseball as I sought employment. In fact, when I was presented with the opportunity to interview for my first internship in MLB’s Labor Relations Department, the thesis quickly became a main point of discussion that, I’d like to think, enhanced my candidacy.”

In his current role at MLB, Freedman helps to provide financial guidance to all 30 ball clubs. Every June, his department oversees the Amateur Draft bonus slotting system, basically enforcing that clubs pay sensible salaries to amateur players according to the round in which they were selected. His department also approves all player and employee contracts and handles collective bargaining with the Major League Baseball Players Association as well as player grievances.

If you ask Freedman, his Kelley education truly covered all the bases of the business of baseball. “In addition to Business Law, I took courses in accounting, finance, management, marketing, operations, and strategy, and I now have a fundamental understanding of their interrelation and synergy. This understanding has been invaluable because all Major League organizations are operating businesses that strive to ‘finish in the black.’”

Published April 11, 2011